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The Independent Critic

STARRING
Antonio Araujo, William Franke, Mark Hattan, Mark Andrew, Haynes, Pedro Hollywood, Amilicar Javier, Jordan Kenneth, Camp, Malik Reed, Dan Teachout, Ben Toomer, Michele Pawk
WRITTEN AND DIRECTED BY
Eddie Prunoske
RUNNING TIME
10 Mins.
OFFICIAL IMDB

 "Intimacy Workshop" Has World Premiere at Nashville 

While Eddie Prunoske's Intimacy Workshop already has several fests lined up, the 10-minute film debut for Prunoske is kicking off in fine fashion with a world premiere at the 2022 Nashville Film Festival this week in Nashville, Tennessee. The film takes place, at least for the most part, in a stark church basement as a group of dour men gather for a symposium on the elusive art of human connection. 

Prunoske is a queer writer and director who spent over a decade directing theater before shifting his focus to filmmaking. It's perhaps not surprising that with his debut film that Prunoske serves up a film that possesses all the, you guessed it, intimacy of theater along with the urgency and emotional vibrance that one often senses in watching a live performance. At times, Intimacy Workshop maintains such a strong emotional resonance that the energy is palpable. Other times, I could barely stifle an awkward chuckle. 

Intimacy Workshop's ensemble is strong throughout. This is a collaborative effort beautifully choreographed emotionally and physically. D.P. Adam Uhl's lensing observes without judgment, inviting us into these men's lives and practically challenging us to define intimacy for ourselves. 

Intimacy Workshop is a quietly engaging film. It's the kind of film that lands softly in your psyche, however, the longer it sits there it's perfectly clear that Prunoske has dug deeper than we initially realized. It's as much an intimacy workshop for all of us. 

With a long festival journey already assured, Intimacy Workshop is one to watch for those who appreciate thought-provoking and engaging queer cinema from a definite up-and-coming filmmaker. 

Written by Richard Propes
The Independent Critic