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The Independent Critic

STARRING
Jhomar Suyom, Andrew Nadanyi, Lara Amelie Abadir, Oliver Birmingham
WRITTEN AND DIRECTED BY
Maxime Beauchamp
RUNNING TIME
9 Mins.
OFFICIAL FACEBOOK

 Experimental "Iridescence" Comes Out of Vancouver Film School 
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In writer/director Maxime Beauchamp's award-winning student short Iridescence, Logan (Jhomar Suyom) is a 16-year-old boy whose nurturing mother passes away and leaves him with his father, Vince (Andrew Nadanyi), a repressed and abusive man who is fearful of his son's potential for perceived weakness, and even his homosexuality, and responds my forcibly tattooing the boy with powerful, scarring words such as "worthless," "shame," "unnatural," "feminine," and others. 

Iridescence is a gripping and jarring short film, an experimental short told entirely without dialogue and through the communicative medium of interpretive dance that brings to life this story in a rather extraordinary way. 

Iridescence, a film that comes out of the Vancouver Film School, has already proven to be quite popular on the film festival circuit with prizes picked up at Canada Short Film Festival (Armando Fierro, Best Score), Fort Worth Gay and Lesbian Film Festival (Best Student Short), Los Angeles Independent Film Festival Awards (Best Experimental Student Short), and Oniros Film Awards (Best LGBTQ Film, Best Experimental Film, and Best Scenography) among a growing list. 

Armando Fierro's original score does, indeed, drive the film's dramatic heights and enhances the film's expressive, emotionally resonant choreography and the precise, spot-on editing by Duy N. Bui. D.P. Kang Park's lensing provides extraordinary use of darkness and shade, while one mustn't forget the exceptional dance work and character interpretation of Jhomar Suyom, Andrew Nadanyi and Lara Amelie Abadir as stand-outs among a terrific ensemble cast. 

Iridescence explores the lifelong, rippling impact of the labels we use and how those labels become deeply engraved within not just our bodies by our entire beings. Through stellar use of dance, music, lighting and story, Iridescence is a film that deserves its accolades and is worth watching if you get a chance to check it out at a film festival near you.

For more information on Iridescence, check out the film's Facebook page linked to in the credits. 

© Written by Richard Propes
The Independent Critic 

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